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Socioeconomic inequalities related to chronic noncommunicable diseases and disabilities: National Health Survey, 2019

##article.authors##

  • Deborah Carvalho Malta Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Escola de Enfermagem, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Enfermagem, Belo Horizonte (MG), Brasil https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8214-5734
  • Regina Tomie Ivata Bernal Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Escola de Enfermagem, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Enfermagem, Belo Horizonte (MG), Brasil
  • Margareth Guimaraes Lima Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Departamento de Saúde Coletiva. Campinas, São Paulo, Brasil
  • Alanna Gomes da Silva Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Escola de Enfermagem, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Enfermagem, Belo Horizonte (MG), Brasil
  • Célia Landmann Szwarcwald Instituto de Comunicação e Informação Científica e Tecnológica em Saúde, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro (RJ)
  • Marilisa Berti de Azevedo Barros Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas. Campinas, SP, Brasil

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1590/1980-549720210011.supl.2

Keywords:

Chronic Disease, Disabled Persons, Health Inequalities, Social Inequity

Abstract

Objective: to analyze socioeconomic inequalities in the self-reported prevalence of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) and disabilities in the Brazilian adult population. Methods: Cross-sectional study with data from the National Health Survey carried out in 2019. The self-reported prevalences of individuals with some NCDs were calculated, according to sociodemographic characteristics; and the prevalence and prevalence ratio of these diseases and degrees of disability, according to education and possession of a private health plan. Results: 47.6% of the population reported having at least one NCD. NCDs increased progressively with age and were more prevalent in women (PR: 1.13; 95% CI 1.1-1.15), in black individuals (PR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01-1, 06) or pardos (PR: 1.05; 95% CI: 1.01-1.09), illiterate or with incomplete elementary education (PR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.08-1.16), in the residents the Southeast (PR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.05-1.14) and the South (PR: 1.07; 95% CI: 1.03-1.12) and among individuals who do not have a health plan private health (PR: 1.02; 95% CI: 1.0-1.05). For the majority of NCDs investigated, the highest reports of disabilities were among those with low education and without health insurance. Conclusion: adults with less education and without private health plans have a higher prevalence of NCDs and a higher degree of disability. Thus, it is important to analyze health indicators in the face of different populations and disparities, in order to understand and monitor health inequalities.  

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Posted

2021-09-10

Section

Health Sciences